Department of English

Faculty of Arts, Chulalongkorn University


Course Reviews

 



2202234  Introduction to the Study of English Literature (2013a)

Course Coordinator: Rongrat Dusdeesurapot

Class Time: M 1012, Th 89

Enrollment:

Responses:

Instructors:

  • Rongrat Dusdeesurapot (section 1; ? responses)

  • Subenja Phaolaungthong (section 2; ? responses)

  • Puckpan Tipayamontri (section 3; ? responses)

  • Nida Tiranasawasdi (section 4; ? responses)

  • Tapanat Khunpakdee (section 5; ? responses)

  • Proud Sethabutr (section 6; ? responses)

Requirements: midterm, final, at least 3 reading responses and other assignments, attendance, participation, presentations and in-class activities

Reading: Coursebook (short stories, poems, short plays), a novel, a full-length play

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(n/a responses)

 

 

Student Review


 


Faculty Statement

 

Faculty Review

 

 


2202235  Reading and Analysis for the Study of English Literature (2012b)

Course Coordinator: Puckpan Tipayamontri

Class Time: M 1112, Th 810

Enrollment: 100

Responses:

Instructors:

  • Puckpan Tipayamontri (section 1; ? responses)

  • Rongrat Dusdeesurapot (section 2; ? responses)

  • Subenja Phaolaungthong (section 3; ? responses)

  • Nida Tiranasawasdi (section 4; ? responses)

  • Tapanat Khunpakdee (section 5; ? responses)

  • Proud Sethabutr (section 6; ? responses)

Requirements: midterm (25%), final (35%), at least 3 reading responses and other assignments (18%), attendance, participation, presentations and in-class activities (12%), 35-page final paper (10%)

Reading: Course packet (short stories, poems, short plays), a novel (J. M. Coetzee, Waiting for the Barbarians), a full-length play (J. B. Priestley, An Inspector Calls)

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(n/a responses)

 

 

Student Review


 


Faculty Statement

 

Faculty Review

 

 

 

2202234  Introduction to the Study of English Literature (2009a)

Course Coordinator: Puckpan Tipayamontri

Class Time: M 1012, W 89

Enrollment: 106

Responses: 76

Instructors:

  • Puckpan Tipayamontri (section 1; 10 responses)

  • Sanguansri Khantavichian (section 2; 15 responses)

  • Rongrat Dusdeesurapot (section 3; 11 responses)

  • Supakarn Iamharit (section 4; 15 responses)

  • Nida Darongsuwan (section 5; 10 responses)

  • Kakanang Pasavoravit (now Yanatchapim Pasavoravate; section 6; 15 responses)

Requirements: midterm (20%), final (30%), 5 reading responses and other assignments (20%), attendance, participation and in-class activities (10%), 46-page final paper (20%)

Reading: Coursebook (short stories, poems, short plays), a novel (Of Mice and Men), a longer play (Cocktail), glossary of literary terms

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(76 responses)

 

 

Student Review

The toughest class you'll be taking in your first semester second year, 234 has a reputation for delivering shock therapy to those who thought they knew how to read English and how to write essay exams right around the fourth week of July if not before. The notoriously low midterm scores galvanizes many students and turns many off. Though there is the usual grumble that exams were hard, respondents say they were fair, fairly graded, and of reasonable length and frequency.

 

But enough about numbers. What do students actually learn in this course? Well, respondents feel, a lot. Both the genre case studies of novel (Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men) and drama (LiCata and Chong's Cocktail) were poignant readings for several people, the latter selection having the bonus of excellent performances at the Bangkok Art and Culture Centre by our Faculty's very own Department of Theatre Arts, with the real-life star of the story, Dr. Krisana Kraisintu herself, attending many shows. Students were happy not only to learn about literature and human life, but also to discover a world-famous Thai pharmacist and were surprised that "my Pharmaceutical Sciences friends hadn't heard of her."

 

Despite the desire to know about master writers and poets, many students cried off Shakespeare. "No more Romeo and Juliet," says one. Just the excerpt (balcony scene) had students running right and left. "Too difficult," they said. Others found most of the reading "very interesting" and dipped into the anthology section (optional further reading) on their own as well.

 

Reading responses were a chore for some and a useful writing experience for others, but the final paper was the most stressful written assignment of all. So start early and "develop" those "arguments"!

 

If you're afraid of hard work, if you're afraid of learning, if you're afraid of thinking for yourself, don't take this course. You have been warned.

Faculty Review

 

 

 

 

2202232  Introduction to the Study of English Fiction (2007a)

Course Coordinator: Pawan Mogya

Class Time: M 10-12, W 8-9

Enrollment: 19

Responses: 5 (4 took course for major, 1 as elective)

Instructor: Puckpan Tipayamontri (group 3)

Requirements: tests (37.5%), final (50%), attendance, participation and assignments (12.5%)

Reading: Course Packet (4 short stories, literary terms review), a novel, handouts

Excellent 4.4 out of 5

(5 responses)

 

 

Student Review

*under construction*

Faculty Review

 

 

 

2202242  Introduction to the Study of English Poetry (2007a)

Course Coordinator: Asst. Prof. Rongrat Dusdeesurapot

Class Time: T 12-2, Th 11-12

Enrollment: 15

Responses: 7.5 (7 took course for major, 1 as elective)

Instructor: Puckpan Tipayamontri (group 3)

Requirements: midterm (25%), final (35%), take-home assignments (25%), attendance, participation and homework (7.5%), 710-page final paper (7.5%)

Reading: Coursebook (includes 39 poems, 93 pp.), handouts

Excellent 4.71 out of 5

(7 responses)

 

Student Review

"Delicious" might not be the first thing that comes to mind when we think of poetry but for one student, "this course is really enjoyable (and delicious) but really hard!"  The Poetry Potluck at the end of class during final paper presentations may have something to do with that gustatory association, but most students do seem to agree that challenging their usual perceptions of things was part of the rewards of the course: "ไม่เคยเรียน POETRY มาก่อนในชีวิต  พอได้เรียนแล้วรู้สึกว่ามันมีอะไรมากมายมากกว่าแค่ กลอนภาษาอังกฤษ."  Seeing different "attitudes" and understanding "poets and their thoughts and culture" were cited as some of what they gained from their exposure to dozens of poems from sonnets to free verse by authors from anonymous 15th-century balladeers to 21st- century US poet laureate Billy Collins.  One student suggested that "there should be more modern poems," another complained of "too many poems," and another commented that "explications are sometimes not quite clear" in the otherwise very well done coursebook.

 

"Classroom atmosphere is very good," said one student, and many agree: "แทบไม่ได้โดดวิชานี้เลยแม้ว่าท่า ทาง อ. จะไม่ได้เช็กชื่อก็ตาม เพราะรู้สึกว่ามันเป็นวิชาที่ต้องเข้าไป ติดตาม / ถกเถียงกันในห้อง พยายามทำการบ้านตามที่ อ. บอกมาก่อนทุกครั้ง."  A couple "want[ed] to have more hours to discuss the poems," "maybe 4 hrs./week."  Everyone applauded the various activities that helped make course material more accessible and exciting.  One student gave this example: "When we learnt the poem 'They,' the instructor gave us paper to draw our picture when we read this poem.  It's very fun."  For another, "Presentations were the assignment that I love because I could share my ideas openly and share ideas that everyone can't see."  One sophomore especially liked "writing my own poems because it took me to study more about poetry in terms of rhyme scheme and meter" as well as "a chance to express myself."  The Poetry "Jeopardy game," proclaimed another, " is the best game on earth yet."

Faculty Statement

English 242 is designed to introduce students to literary study in English and to poetry in English.  This includes research skills, close-reading, speaking and listening in a seminar setting, academic writing, critical and analytical thinking, making an argument, literary terms used in the study of poetry (ex. figures of speech, musical devices, forms and types of poetry).  Poems range from 15th century ballads to contemporary free verse.  Be prepared to work pretty hard.

Faculty Review

 

 

2202242  Introduction to the Study of English Poetry (2006b)

Course Coordinator: Asst. Prof. Supakarn Iamharit

Class Time: W 11-1, F 8-9

Enrollment: 23

Responses: 14 (9 took course for major, 5 as elective)

Instructor: Puckpan Tipayamontri (group 2)

Requirements: midterm (25%), final (40%), take-home assignments (20%), paraphrase homework (5%), 710-page final paper and presentation (10%)

Reading: Course Packet (includes about 40 poems)

Very Good 4.21 out of 5

(14 responses) 

Student Review

A requirement for English majors and frequent elective choice for minors, "Intro Poetry" is said to be "difficult" but "worth studying."

 

While one student said "the classroom atmosphere was not good enough.  It should be more fun," another said that "I have changed because in the past I'm shy to say or share ideas but now I'm not afraid anymore."  Others also found that "If there were no class discussions, I won't have any clue about the poems. A. Puckpan and friends help a lot."

 

Students admit the course is demanding but felt they gained analytical skills and a better understanding of poetry in English.  Others also cited improved thinking, reading and writing skills as well as knowledge about poets, poems, literary terms, and forms/types of poetry.  "The assignments were a bit too difficult, but challenging," another added.

 

A few respondents felt A. Puckpan, who taught the course for the first time last semester,  had too high standards and did not return assignments quickly enough, others found her "great" and "well-prepared."

 

Many students complained of "too many questions and insufficient time" during tests, so pace yourself well for exams!

 

The class webpage provided further sources, material, and detailed schedule for the course and students found it helped them study, though not everyone had internet access at home.

 

Overall, while many students felt they "suffered" through the course, they also found it "not only helps sharpen your critical skills but helps you grow spiritually as well" and eventually several produced some of their best work: "I'm so satisfied and so proud of our group paper."

 

 

 


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Last updated March 8, 2013